Red meat eats more to increase the risk of diabetes

According to a study conducted by Harvard University in the United States, increasing the intake of red meat will increase the risk of diabetes.

Harvard University conducted a survey of three groups of people during the study. The first group consisted of 26,357 men aged 40-75 who were medically-related occupations other than physicians; the second and third groups were 48,709 and 74,077 women aged 22-55 for female nurses.

The survey records the intake of red meat by means of self-counting. The survey is conducted every four years to investigate changes in the intake of red meat (more, less, and unchanged). The longest investigation time is 12- In the course of 16 years, 7540 cases of diabetes were confirmed.

Among them, compared with the risk of diabetes in the “invariant intake” group, the risk of diabetes increased by 1.21 times in the group of “increased small to medium dose (about 12.8-42.5 grams per day)”, “increased medium dose” The risk of developing diabetes in a large number (more than about 42.5 grams per day) increased by 1.48 times. If this result is based on a group with less red meat intake, the results are clearer. If a group increases from no more than 24.3 grams of red meat per day to more than 85 grams of red meat per day, the risk of diabetes increases by 1.99 times compared to the group with the same “intake”.

The study suggests that the increased risk of diabetes in the population with increased red meat intake is partly due to the increase in body weight due to the increase in red meat, but the increase in body weight is not the reason for the increase in risk.

On the other hand, data on the risk of developing diabetes after 4 years of red meat intake are within the margin of error, but once the tracking results rise to 12-16 years, it will be found that “a small to medium population is reduced every day (every day The risk of diabetes was reduced to 0.95 times in the population of about 12.8-42.5 grams), and the risk of “medium to large amount (more than 42.5 grams per day) was reduced to 0.86 times. However, the 0.86 data is out of tolerance and therefore not accurate.

The researchers said that all the studies so far have been linked to the relationship between the high intake of red meat and the risk of diabetes, and this study is a phased study that focuses on the “change” of red meat and the risk of diabetes. The relationship between the two is also the first study in this area.

At the same time, the researchers said that in the same four-year investigation period, increasing the intake of red meat will significantly increase the risk of diabetes, but reducing the intake of red meat has no significant reduction in the risk of diabetes. The deeper connection between red meat and the risk of diabetes requires more in-depth research.