Eating blueberries can prevent type 2 diabetes

A new study found that eating more fruits, especially blueberries, apples and grapes, can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Eating blueberries can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by 26%, while eating 3 servings of other fruits a day can only reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by 2%. The new study also found that drinking juice has no anti-sugar effect.

In the new study, researchers from the United Kingdom, the United States, and Singapore used data from three large studies to study the association between eating fruit and type 2 diabetes. The study involved 187,382 Americans who participated in a questionnaire on diets every four years. The questionnaire included eating grapes (or raisins), peaches, plums or apricots, prunes, bananas, cantaloupes, apples or pears. The number and daily intake of fruits such as oranges, grapefruits, strawberries and blueberries. The study found that 12,198 (6.5%) of them had type 2 diabetes.

Data analysis showed that 3 blueberries, grapes and raisins, apples and pears per week significantly reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes. All kinds of fruits have a certain hypoglycemic effect, but these fruits have more obvious hypoglycemic effects, mainly because of the rich anthocyanin content in these fruits. Animal experiments have found that anthocyanins can improve blood sugar levels. In addition, the natural polyphenols contained in these fruits also have excellent health benefits.

The study also found that drinking juice would increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. The reason is that the juice contains much less nutrients than the fruit. Replacing juice with blueberries reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 33%, replacing juice with grapes and raisins, reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes by 19%, and replacing juice with apples and pears reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 7%. Oranges, peaches, plums and apricots have similar effects.