Not eating breakfast may increase the incidence of heart disease

According to the Asahi Shimbun, on July 23, the cardiovascular authority magazine “Circulution” published an article saying that the incidence of heart disease such as coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in people who did not eat breakfast was 1.27 times that of people who ate breakfast.

The survey was conducted by 25,902 people (45-82 years old) of medical-related occupational males (such as dentists, veterinarians, pharmacists, etc.) other than American physicians. In 1992, whether to eat breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea, dinner, Self-voting, such as staying up late and eating habits, 16 years later, a total of 1527 cases of coronary artery disease (heart disease) and myocardial infarction were found.

Those who did not eat breakfast accounted for 13% of the total number, and 87% of them ate breakfast. After removing the effects on the heart due to obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, it was found that people who did not eat breakfast increased the risk of coronary artery disease by 1.27 times than those who ate breakfast. In addition, people who stayed up late after dinner had a 1.55 times higher risk of coronary artery disease than those who did not. But there is no difference in eating more than one meal a day or less.

According to the researchers, the study of the relationship between eating habits and the incidence of coronary artery disease, such as breakfast, day and night, is the first time. Some small-scale clinical trials so far have shown that not eating breakfast can prevent insulin from controlling blood sugar and abnormal blood lipids. Researchers believe that people who do not eat breakfast will increase the risk of coronary artery disease due to obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure or dyslipidemia. In another study by the same group of researchers, it was said that people who do not eat breakfast will increase their body weight by more than 5KG, thereby increasing the incidence of diabetes.

The researchers also said that the study was based on a survey of male medical professionals with high dietary quality and may not be applicable to all occupational groups, so future research on other groups will continue.